Something wicked this way comes.

Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)
engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)

engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

will2kill:

wattthefisk:

Our selection of the top ten abandoned places we would visit if we weren’t so scared!

What the hell is that disco ball lookin place toward the end?
damionkare:

Afropunk 2014
Fort Greene, Brooklyn
Photographer: Damion Reid
IG: @BOTBW2013

damionkare:

Afropunk 2014

Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Photographer: Damion Reid

IG: @BOTBW2013

Still not quite there, but progressing. Funny how creative I become when I actually listen to myself. 

0rient-express:

...dawn... | by Markus Grunau.

octoswan:

I made these as a way to compile all the geographical vocabulary that I thought was useful and interesting for writers. Some descriptors share categories, and some are simplified, but for the most part everything is in its proper place. Not all the words are as useable as others, and some might take tricky wording to pull off, but I hope these prove useful to all you writers out there!

(save the images to zoom in on the pics)

queer-surfer:

Oh my god guys, I am actually doing this. I can’t believe it. Please, please, please signal boost the shit outta this. I have been homeless on the streets and couch-surfing for the past 4 years, since I was 18yrs old and my parents choose religion over their child. This is my fucking ticket to freedom, something I have been dreaming of since the first time I attempted to run away from the abuse.
I have poured every last ounce of hope I’ve got left in my reserves for this. I haven’t looked forward to something more than a month in the future in years. I never envisioned myself living past 25, but my god in this moment I hope I can live past 50. I just… fuck. I’m so excited. :3

Today in the burrow of brooding: blanket and a book (and appalling accidental alliterations). And negative thoughts. This shit is like a constant siege.

[Dionysus] himself is unimaginable without his followers but does not resemble them. He is seldom drunk, seldom mad, never sexually aroused. The relationship with Ariadne, often depicted, is dignified and restrained. Even in grim situations he retains a smiling tranquility which comes suddenly to seem sinister. (Was he a model for Plato’s portrayal of Socrates?) The calmness of the god of madness is a characteristic Dionysian paradox. His followers surrender their individuality in the collective excitement. But they do not achieve union with the source of that excitement, however close they may seem to approach. Dionysus eludes them, and retains his enigmatic smile.
Polytheism and Society at Athens by Robert Parker (via elucipher)